Posts tagged: antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

Ondine Study Shows Reduction of Endotracheal Tube Biofilm Using Photodisinfection

Ventilator-associated pneumonia is one of the most common and deadliest forms of healthcare-associated infections.  In the U.S alone, more than one million patients in healthcare facilities require mechanical ventilation every year. Up to 1 in 4 of these patients are reported to develop ventilator-associated pneumonia and up to half of them will die.1

Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), commonly known as Photodisinfection, is a non-invasive technique that used to study the reduction of biofilm in the lumen of an endotracheal tube. When patients undergo mechanical ventilation, an endotracheal tube is inserted into their throat to assist with breathing. This tube has long been recognized as a major factor in a patient’s risk for developing biofilm infections. For patients that require mechanical ventilation, such as those in ICUs, the biofilm can dislodge from the endotracheal tube and enter the lungs directly, often resulting in difficult-to-treat pneumonia.

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Ondine Congratulates Dr. Bryon Bhagwandin For Presenting His Research At The International AIDS Society Conference 2011

The use of Photodisinfection to disinfect the birth canal is a novel approach that can bypass the stigma associated with HIV treatment and any reliance on patient compliance.

Ondine is pleased to congratulate Dr. Bryon Bhagwandin of Vitalwave™ on the publication of his abstract at the International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference. This is an important accomplishment as it highlights the need to develop new approaches in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission.

A higher vaginal HIV viral load has been independently associated with a higher risk of transmission. Dr. Bhagwandin’s study evaluated the use of antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT), also known as Photodisinfection, as a means to reduce the vaginal viral load of pregnant women infected with HIV/AIDS. In 2008, more than 1.4 million pregnant women were living with this disease. An additional 430,000 children had been infected through mother-to-child transmission.

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Study Shows Increased Effectiveness Of Light-Activated Antimicrobial Agents Against MRSA

Many bacteria capable of causing life-threatening infections are now resistant to a wide range of antibiotics.  It is essential, therefore, that alternatives to antibiotics are developed for use in the prevention and treatment of such infections. Light-activated antimicrobial agents (LAAAs) are one possible new approach to this problem. LAAAs are compounds that display no antimicrobial activity in the dark but, when exposed to light of a certain wavelength, can kill microbes in the vicinity.  One of the essential attributes of any antimicrobial agent, including a LAAA, is that it be effective at low concentrations so as to reduce the risks of any toxicity to the patient.

The new LAAAs as seen through a very powerful electron microscope. The diameter of each particle is approximately 0.000000005 metre.

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The Three Myths About Photodisinfection

I’ve talked before about how photodisinfection works, but I want to take a moment to clarify what I think are the three most common myths about the technology we’re working on here at Ondine.

It’s Not That New

Our products are often met with scepticism because people are unfamiliar with photodisinfection as a treatment, or even as a science.  Truth be told, photodisinfection has existed for over 100 years[i], and the research behind it has a solid foundation in the literature extending back well over 20 years.  Check out this short reference list if you don’t believe me. So why, with all this research, is photodisinfection only creeping into the marketplace now?  The simple answer is that, until Ondine, most companies have been a little hesitant to put the work in to make it a success.  Photodisinfection requires a lot from a company: an engineering team for a light source, a microbiology team for the preclinical tests, a chemistry team for the careful formulation of the photosensitizer and a regulatory team to get the product cleared for use in trials and approved clinical use.  When you add in quality control, finance, administration, and sales and marketing, you can see the inherent challenges facing a company. You can trust me that the science is there (and growing), and Ondine has proven that it has what it takes to make these products a reality.

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Study Using Periowave™ Shows Rapid Resolution Of Aggressive Periodontitis

We’re pleased to announce today that the results of a study involving antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT), or Photodisinfection, were presented at the 13th International Photodynamic Association World Congress. This study, conducted by Dr. Veronique Benhamou, evaluated the use of the Periowave™ Photodisinfection System in the treatment of an aggressive case of periodontitis.

The current standard of care for aggressive periodontitis involves scaling and root planing in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. The subject of this study received scaling and root planing followed by aPDT (PeriowaveTM) in place of any antibiotic therapy.  This protocol produced rapid, clinically significant results and no adverse events were reported.  The significance of the results was confirmed through standard clinical tests and x-rays.

Periowave™ is a painless, non-invasive procedure that can significantly improve treatment outcomes when added to scaling and root planing.

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The Case for Photodisinfection

Humans are multicellular creatures each comprised of trillions of cells. Oddly enough, bacteria in our bodies outnumber our human cells by 10:1, although their size is, on average, about one tenth of a human cell. When seen in this light, humans really are part human and part bacteria.  We are dependent on the maintenance of a delicate balance between human cells and bacterial cells for good health as we coexist with bacteria in a symbiotic relationship. There are estimated to be between 500-1,000 species of bacteria living in the human gut and skin.  Some of our bacteria are known to perform certain tasks that are critical. Without our bacteria, for instance, we would be unable to digest and process our food intake.  These commensal bacteria are widely known as our “flora”. Too many of any one kind of bacteria, and we are left in poor health. Bacteria, therefore, play a very important role in human health and human disease. Read more »

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