Posts tagged: Photodisinfection

Working at Ondine: A Career Leading To A Harvard MBA

December 14, 2010 was a really special day for me. I was in my office when I got the news – I had been accepted to Harvard Business School’s MBA program. Now, as my time at Ondine comes to an end, I’ve been asked to recount my story, and how I got to the enviable position of being able to leave a job that I love for an unbelievable opportunity.

I began at Ondine in January of 2008 after returning from a backpacking trip around Western Europe. I had secured the internship the summer beforehand, and viewed it as the perfect opportunity. I had always been interested in business, but I was convinced that I would be attending dental school, having written the entrance examinations during my undergraduate degree. Ondine, having a commercially available dental product, was the hybrid I was looking for. So, armed with only my UBC degree in Cell Biology and Genetics, I set off to see what business was all about. Read more »

The Three Myths About Photodisinfection

I’ve talked before about how photodisinfection works, but I want to take a moment to clarify what I think are the three most common myths about the technology we’re working on here at Ondine.

It’s Not That New

Our products are often met with scepticism because people are unfamiliar with photodisinfection as a treatment, or even as a science.  Truth be told, photodisinfection has existed for over 100 years[i], and the research behind it has a solid foundation in the literature extending back well over 20 years.  Check out this short reference list if you don’t believe me. So why, with all this research, is photodisinfection only creeping into the marketplace now?  The simple answer is that, until Ondine, most companies have been a little hesitant to put the work in to make it a success.  Photodisinfection requires a lot from a company: an engineering team for a light source, a microbiology team for the preclinical tests, a chemistry team for the careful formulation of the photosensitizer and a regulatory team to get the product cleared for use in trials and approved clinical use.  When you add in quality control, finance, administration, and sales and marketing, you can see the inherent challenges facing a company. You can trust me that the science is there (and growing), and Ondine has proven that it has what it takes to make these products a reality.

Read more »

Study Using Periowave™ Shows Rapid Resolution Of Aggressive Periodontitis

We’re pleased to announce today that the results of a study involving antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT), or Photodisinfection, were presented at the 13th International Photodynamic Association World Congress. This study, conducted by Dr. Veronique Benhamou, evaluated the use of the Periowave™ Photodisinfection System in the treatment of an aggressive case of periodontitis.

The current standard of care for aggressive periodontitis involves scaling and root planing in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. The subject of this study received scaling and root planing followed by aPDT (PeriowaveTM) in place of any antibiotic therapy.  This protocol produced rapid, clinically significant results and no adverse events were reported.  The significance of the results was confirmed through standard clinical tests and x-rays.

Periowave™ is a painless, non-invasive procedure that can significantly improve treatment outcomes when added to scaling and root planing.

Read more »

Ondine To Launch Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) Photodisinfection Clinical Study

We are thrilled to announce that the FDA has approved a human clinical study to investigate the use of photodisinfection to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). VAP occurs when a lung infection develops in a patient ventilated with an endotracheal tube and continues to be the #1 cause of healthcare-associated infections in intensive care units. In the U.S alone, more than 1.3 million patients are mechanically ventilated every year. Of these patients, 10%-20% will develop ventilator-associated pneumonia, and up to half of them will die.

“A successful VAP study would represent a key step towards the commercialization of this new application of photodisinfection which utilizes Ondine’s patented technology and products…(our technology) has been proven to be highly effective at eliminating biofilms in ex vivo models, it is therefore ideally suited for the elimination of endotracheal tube biofilms resulting in the prevention of VAP” says Carolyn Cross, Chairman & CEO of Ondine.

Read more »

Ondine CEO, Carolyn Cross, Inducted Onto The Board of the International Photodynamic Association

“We have spent the last 70 years using and misusing antibiotics to treat and prevent common infectious diseases…It is therefore imperative that non-antibiotic solutions to fight infections are developed in order to preserve the next generation of effective medicine.”

Carolyn Cross Inducted Onto Board of IPA

Our CEO has done it again. Two weeks after being featured in the Vancouver Sun Newspaper, Ms. Cross has now been inducted onto the Board of the International Photodynamic Association (IPA). Founded in 1986, the IPA brings together the most distinguished international clinicians and scientists involved in researching and developing photodynamic therapy. Ms. Cross will help raise awareness about the benefits of this technology and help bring it to the forefront of medicine.

We are very pleased to share this announcement with all of you today. Ms. Cross has been with Ondine for over a decade and was one of the initial founders and financial supporters of our company. Under her leadership, Ondine has developed a rapid R & D program and is now seen as one of the world’s most renowned group of experts on photodynamic therapy and photodisinfection. Read more »

Ondine Chairman & CEO, Carolyn Cross, Featured In Vancouver Sun Newspaper

Carolyn Cross, Chairman & CEO of Ondine Biomedical Inc, understands too well the importance of supporting women in business.  This week, the Vancouver Sun Newspaper highlighted her involvement & support for this week’s Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO) International Conference. This is a unique event that connects highly successful women from around the world in promoting the advancement of women across all industries. The WPO is an exclusive membership organization for women presidents of multimillion-dollar companies. Collectively, members of the WPO have 24,000 years in business, generate $14 billion in annual revenues, and employ 105,000 employees.

Carolyn Cross, Chairman & CEO of Ondine Biomedical Inc, was featured in today's Vancouver Sun Newspaper

Read more »

Photodynamic Disinfection (PDD) is the Antimicrobial application of PDT (aPDT)

The key features of aPDT can be summarized as follows [1]:

  • Broad spectrum of action, since one photosensitizer can act on bacteria, fungi, yeasts and parasitic protozoa
  • Efficacy independent of the resistance pattern of the given microbe
  • Extensive reduction of pathogen counts in minutes, without damaging host cells
  • No selection of resistant strains after multiple treatments
  • Readily available, non-toxic photosensitizers
  • Relatively low-cost light sources for activation of the photosensitizing agent
  • No cytotoxic effects on key sensitive host cells such as human keratinocytes or fibroblasts

The treatment of topical infections has traditionally relied upon antibiotics in either topical or systemic dosage forms. However, the inexorable increase in antibiotic resistance (including to vancomycin and other glycopeptides) has led to the spectre of potentially untreatable infections, and this in turn has led to the development of alternative antimicrobial approaches based on light-activated chemotherapy 2, 3. Photodynamic Disinfection (called antimicrobial PDT by the scientific community) is an extension to traditional photodynamic therapy (PDT) which was originally focused on oncotherapy and intra-ocular indications, utilizing systemically-administered photosensitizers. Read more »

Healthcare-Associated Infections: A $35-$45 billion problem

“Healthcare-associated infections are one of the biggest causes of avoidable harm and unnecessary death in the developed world” – World Health Organization

Healthcare-associated infections kill more than 99,000 people every year

Over the next few blog posts, we’ll be discussing a group of infections known as healthcare-associated infections, or HAIs. In the US alone, more than 99,000 people die each year from these infections1. While this cost on human life is high, the financial toll is equally staggering . The World Health Organization has called the HAIs one of the biggest causes of avoidable harm and unnecessary deaths in the developed world. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that HAIs add $35-$45 billion in costs to the US healthcare system each year2. As such, healthcare-associated infections have become a costly public health concern that demands immediate attention.

HAIs occur when a patient acquires an infection during the course of treatment at, or a visit to, a healthcare facility. After a patient acquires a HAI, the ramifications are often excessively expensive and deadly. In fact, HAIs are responsible for more deaths each year than car accidents, breast cancer, anorexia or AIDS. On average, they add 19 days to a patient’s hospital stay, and increase medical expenses by more than $45,0003. Read more »

An Introduction to Photodynamic Medicine

There are two kinds of light — the glow that illumines, and the glare that obscures.”
James Thurber was almost certainly unaware of photodynamic medicine when he authored that quote in 1963, or else he might have added a 3rd type of light – the glimmer that heals. Loosely put, the word photodynamic means using light to cause an action or effect.  This definition, though simple, succinctly summarizes the concept of photodynamic medicine – a set of therapies that leverages visible light to create a targeted, potent effect. Read more »

The Case for Photodisinfection

Humans are multicellular creatures each comprised of trillions of cells. Oddly enough, bacteria in our bodies outnumber our human cells by 10:1, although their size is, on average, about one tenth of a human cell. When seen in this light, humans really are part human and part bacteria.  We are dependent on the maintenance of a delicate balance between human cells and bacterial cells for good health as we coexist with bacteria in a symbiotic relationship. There are estimated to be between 500-1,000 species of bacteria living in the human gut and skin.  Some of our bacteria are known to perform certain tasks that are critical. Without our bacteria, for instance, we would be unable to digest and process our food intake.  These commensal bacteria are widely known as our “flora”. Too many of any one kind of bacteria, and we are left in poor health. Bacteria, therefore, play a very important role in human health and human disease. Read more »

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Staypressed theme by Themocracy