Posts tagged: University College London

Study Shows Increased Effectiveness Of Light-Activated Antimicrobial Agents Against MRSA

Many bacteria capable of causing life-threatening infections are now resistant to a wide range of antibiotics.  It is essential, therefore, that alternatives to antibiotics are developed for use in the prevention and treatment of such infections. Light-activated antimicrobial agents (LAAAs) are one possible new approach to this problem. LAAAs are compounds that display no antimicrobial activity in the dark but, when exposed to light of a certain wavelength, can kill microbes in the vicinity.  One of the essential attributes of any antimicrobial agent, including a LAAA, is that it be effective at low concentrations so as to reduce the risks of any toxicity to the patient.

The new LAAAs as seen through a very powerful electron microscope. The diameter of each particle is approximately 0.000000005 metre.

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New Application of Photodynamic Disinfection to be Funded by UK’s Medical Research Council: Catheter-Associated Infection Prevention

Today we announced a significant new opportunity for both our company and for the Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) world. By awarding our groups a £ 1 million award to develop PDT based products to prevent catheter associated infections, the UK Government has validated the need for solutions as well as endorsed the potential of Photodynamic Therapy in this role.

Together with a team of multi-disciplined experts at University College London (UCL), Ondine will collaborate on an important new initiative which leverages our combined 30 plus years of history in photodynamics to develop a new major class of medical devices based on Photodynamic disinfection. The new class of products will address the multi-billion dollar issue of catheter-associated infections, firmly placing Ondine as a leading supplier of innovative non-antibiotic products addressing  the $35-$45 billion per year healthcare-associated infection (HAI) market1. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are considered to be the largest source of HAIs, representing about 30% of all reported cases, with catheter-associated UTIs representing 75% of this number. Read more »

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