Posts tagged: urinary catheters

Catheter-Associated UTIs: How Infection Occurs

Urinary tract infections are one of the most common healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in the US, accounting for 30% of all reported cases.  Approximately 75% of these UTIs are associated with the use of urinary catheters1, which are called catheter-associated UTIs. Patients with long term catheterization have been shown to have a higher risk of developing a catheter-associated biofilm infection.

In the US, more than five million hospital and nursing home patients require urinary catheterization every year2. This process is illustrated in the images above. During urinary catheterization, a thin flexible plastic tube is lubricated and inserted into a patient’s urethra. Once the catheter enters the bladder, a small balloon is inflated to hold the tube in place. A urine drainage bag with an emptying spout is connected to the external end of the catheter. This end collects the urine. Read more »

Prevention of catheter-associated UTI is focus of new CDC Guidelines

Last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a national guideline on the prevention of catheter-associated UTIs. Dr. Carolyn Gould, the primary author of these guidelines, has blogged to bring awareness to this growing group of infections. In her post, she calls catheter-associated UTIs “one of the most common, yet most preventable” types of healthcare-associated infections.

The new CDC guideline for the prevention of catheter-associated UTIs is an updated and expanded version of the original published thirty years ago. Today, urinary tract infections are the #1 most common healthcare-associated infection. They account for 30% of all reported cases of HAIs and are responsible for killing an estimated 13,000 Americans every year2. Read more »

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